Video - Les valseuses, a remixed version of Idylle (men assaulting a nursing woman) - NSFW

Brigitte Fossey gets her milk stolen in Going Places

Those who have read the short story Idylle written by Maupassant, they might relate a scene from Going places (originally entitled 'Les valseuses') to it. The movie features "two whimsical, aimless thugs who harass and assault women", amongst other crimes. In that specific scene I'm telling here about, they manage to catch a train. This train is empty apart from a young beautiful woman who breastfeeds her baby. Shamelessly, the two men watch the scene, half intimidate the woman, half "buy" her with money ... and one of them steals her milk.

The story significantly differs from Idylle as the men are not hungry at all. They have money, food and offer the woman to take it. On her side, the young woman (Brigitte Fossey) is not happy to see the sick interest from the men for her ability to milk. Still we soon discover, that she's the one who is hungry. But not for food. Her husband is currently doing his military service and she's been alone for a while. This might explain why, frightened by the two men in the first place, she finally seems to enjoy what can be compared to a rape.

The example, from Les Valseuses, is a disturbing scene, which has almost unanimously been read as expressive of a misogynistic abuse of male power. Brigitte Fossey plays a nursing mother, travelling in a train, who, while feeding her baby, is accosted by the two male aggressors lean-Claude and Pierrot. This is intended by the male characters to be a very erotic episode: their intention is to become sexually aroused so that Pierrot can prove to himself that he is still virile, but this quite unambiguously backfires on them, and the eroticism which emerges is. paradoxically for them and the spectator, located within and for the female subject. After considerable resistance, the character played by Fossey consents to allow Pierrot to suck at her breast in return for money proffered by lean-Claude. As the action of the scene advances, the mother clearly begins to experience a sexual pleasure that surpasses the arousal of the men. Yet, at the same time she continues to look directly at her aggressors, refusing to see them as such, and challenging them to make sense of her reactions. In this way, the female character rejects the abuse of male power that they seek to enact on her, and displaces the centre of narrative attention, against the narrative agents, from the male to the female. Extract from the book Bertrand Blier, bySue Harris.

 

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